Archive
Online Pressroom

Contact:
Samantha Schmidt
sschmidt@arrs.org


For Release: April 23, 2009


Majority of Ordering Physicians Lack Knowledge of Radiation Exposure Risks from CT

Ordering physicians have limited knowledge of CT-related radiation exposure and its associated risks, according to a study performed at the Carilion Clinic in Roanoke, VA.

“More than 100 surveys were completed by physicians from various specialties who order CT scans at a tertiary-care teaching hospital,” said Jeremy McBride, MD, lead author of the study. “When physician knowledge regarding radiation was assessed, 63% underestimated the radiation dose of one abdominal-pelvic CT in chest radiograph equivalents. When asked if they believed a single abdominal-pelvic CT increases a patients’ risk of cancer nearly 80% responded affirmatively; however, 74% significantly underestimated the risk as published in literature. When asked if they regularly disclose the risks associated with CT scans with patients, nearly 60% responded affirmatively; however only 20% said the risk of exposure was part of that disclosure,” said Dr. McBride. “When asked if radiation exposure and cumulative prior radiation exposure influenced their decision, 48% and 59% respectively, responded it had no or little influence on their decision. Forty-seven percent reported that risk of litigation significantly influenced their decision to order a CT scan on a given patient,” he said. Ben E. Paxton, MD, and Richard M. Wardrop III, MD, worked with Dr. McBride on this study.

“Most of the time, when a CT scan is ordered it can be justified. When a CT is appropriately ordered patients should be aware that the examination has been recommended based upon its diagnostic value and that radiation exposure will be minimized. If patients are concerned, they should feel comfortable asking their physician how an imaging examination will answer a specific question and how it will affect their clinical management. They can also make their physician aware of their concern about radiation exposure from medical imaging and discuss appropriate alternatives,” said Dr. McBride.

“Radiation education should be discussed with medical students and residents during training, as well as with practicing physicians in the form of institutional conferences or workshops. Radiologists and scientists trained in the field of radiation protection in medicine should be contacted by ordering physicians for consultation prior to ordering whenever there are questions regarding the right test or the safety of the test for a particular patient,” he said.

This study will be presented at the 2009 ARRS Annual Meeting in Boston, MA, April 26-30. For a copy of the full study, please contact Heather Curry via email at hcurry@arrs.org.

About ARRS

The American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) was founded in 1900 and is the oldest radiology society in the United States. Its monthly journal, the American Journal of Roentgenology, began publication in 1906. Radiologists from all over the world attend the ARRS annual meeting to participate in instructional courses, scientific paper presentations and scientific and commercial exhibits related to the field of radiology. The Society is named after the first Nobel Laureate in Physics, Wilhelm Röentgen, who discovered the x-ray in 1895. ###


Contact


Add your name/company to the ARRS PRESS LIST

iconGoldMiner     iconFacebook     iconTwitter     iconLinkedIn     iconYouTube     iconAJR 

CONTACT ARRS | ABOUT ARRS | PRESSROOM | ADVERTISING | PRIVACY POLICY | TERMS OF USE