Archive
Online Pressroom

Contact:
Samantha Schmidt
sschmidt@arrs.org


For Release: June 9, 2009


New Study Indicates Radiologists Need Standards to Ensure Optimal Visual Accuracy

Radiologists, like professional pilots for example, depend on good vision as part of their occupation. However, radiologists unlike pilots are not required to undergo regular vision testing. A new study found that approximately 50% of radiologists surveyed indicated they don’t recall ever having their vision tested or it had been 24 months or longer since their last vision exam.

The study, performed at four different types of hospitals in the US and abroad, included 48 radiologists who opted to undergo a brief survey before undergoing visual acuity testing. “Of the 48 participating radiologists, eight could not recall ever having their vision examined,” said Nabile Safdar, MD, lead author of the study, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. “Fourteen of the participants reported that their last eye examinations were 24 months or more in the past. One radiologist even indicated that it had been 15 years since his last eye examination,” said Dr. Safdar. The visual acuity of the participants at any given measurement ranged from 20/30 to 20/10.

“Physicians and patients depend on the ability of radiologists to accurately discriminate findings and render appropriate diagnoses based on these findings,” he said.

“Although the variation we found in visual acuity among radiologists is unlikely to have an influence on clinical diagnostic performance, as radiologists, we may have a responsibility to our patients and ourselves—to make sure our vision is as good as possible. In the future, professional guidelines should be considered to ensure optimal visual accuracy,” said Dr. Safdar.

This study appears in the June issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology. For a copy of the full study, please contact Heather Curry via email at hcurry@arrs.org.

Click here for abstract.

About ARRS

The American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) was founded in 1900 and is the oldest radiology society in the United States. Its monthly journal, the American Journal of Roentgenology, began publication in 1906. Radiologists from all over the world attend the ARRS annual meeting to participate in instructional courses, scientific paper presentations and scientific and commercial exhibits related to the field of radiology. The Society is named after the first Nobel Laureate in Physics, Wilhelm Röentgen, who discovered the x-ray in 1895. ###


Contact


Add your name/company to the ARRS PRESS LIST

iconGoldMiner     iconFacebook     iconTwitter     iconLinkedIn     iconYouTube     iconAJR 

CONTACT ARRS | ABOUT ARRS | PRESSROOM | ADVERTISING | PRIVACY POLICY | TERMS OF USE