Body MRI Online Course

Learn the Latest Body MRI Techniques, Practical Applications, and More

CME Renewed Through 2019

With ARRS Body MRI education, you will learn state-of-the-art body MRI techniques, the practical applications of these techniques, and the key MRI features of a vast array of disease processes as they involve the abdomen, pelvis, breast, vascular structures, and musculoskeletal system. It includes online lectures as well as a hard copy of the accompanying book—shipped to you at no additional cost.

Learn and earn credit at your own pace with unlimited access to this course through June 4, 2019. See below for detailed information and learning outcomes.

This course offers 30 CME and SA-CME Credits following completion of an online test.

ARRS Member price: $695
ARRS In-Training Member price: $349
Nonmember price: $1199

Or consider the stand-alone book.

Learning Outcomes and Modules

Following completion of the program, participants should be familiar with current state-of-the-art body MR imaging techniques, the practical applications of these techniques, and the key MR imaging features of a vast array of disease processes as they involve the abdomen, pelvis, breast, vascular structures, and musculoskeletal system. Participants should be able to apply the techniques and practical applications described in the sessions to continuously improve their clinical performance.

Module 1 — Technique

  • State of the Art Abdominal MRI: an Update—S. Reeder
  • Pelvic MRI Protocal Update—C. Tempany
  • Abdominal MRI Artifacts: Friends and Foes—J. Leyendecker
  • Diffusion-Weighed MRI: Body Applications—S. Lewis

Module 2 — Liver

  • MRI of Focal Benign Liver Lesions—R. Nelson
  • MRI of Malignant Focal Hepatic Lesions—H. Hussain
  • MRI of Cirrhosis, Including LI-RADS Reporting—D. Mitchell
  • MRI of Other Diffuse Liver Diseases: Fat and Iron—C. Sirlin

Module 3 — Pancreas/Biliary

  • MRI and MR Pancreatography of Cystic Pancreatic Neoplasms—K. Mortele
  • MRI of Solid Pancreatic Neoplasms—K. Sandrasegaran
  • MRI of Pancreatic Inflammation—D. Morgan
  • MR Cholangiography—J. Soto

Module 4 — Gastrointestinal

  • MR Enterography—J. Fidler
  • MRI of Rectal Cancer—M. Smith
  • MRI of Perianal Fistulas—M. Harisinghani
  • Dynamic MRI of the Pelvic Floor—G. Bennett

Module 5 — Renal/Adrenal

  • MR Urography—M. Sun
  • MRI of the Adrenal Glands—I. Francis
  • MRI of Cystic Renal Masses—G. Israel
  • MRI of Solid Renal Masses—I. Pedrosa

Module 6 — MRI Safety/Contrast/QA

  • MRI Contrast Agents: NSF and Beyond—D. Bluemke
  • Update on Liver MRI Contrast Agents—D. Sahani
  • MRI Safety, 2013: An Overview—E. Kanal
  • MRI Quality Assurance: Lessons Learned—J. Pollock

Module 7 — Pelvis

  • Key Concepts in Multiparametric MRI of Prostate Cancer—F. Coakley
  • MRI of Benign Female Pelvis—F. Fennessy
  • MRI of Gynecologic Malignancy—B. Foster
  • MRI in Pregnancy—L. Poder

Module 8 — Pediatric Body MRI/MR Angiography

  • Pediatric Body MRI: Current Practice—E. Lee
  • Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI of Cancer—P. Choyke
  • Body MR Angiography—M. Prince
  • MR Angiography: Body Applications—J. Carr

Module 9 — Breast

  • Breast MRI: Optimal Technique, Artifacts, and Pitfalls—L. Moy
  • Breast MRI: Malignant Lesions—C. Comstock
  • Breast MRI: The BI-RADS Lexicon—K. Oh
  • Breast MRI: Lesion Analysis and Interpretation—P. Slanetz

Module 10 — Musculoskeletal

  • MRI of Shoulder Instability—T. Miller
  • MRI of the Hip: Intraarticular Pathology and Impingement—M. Bredella
  • Wrist MRI: The Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex and Scapholunate and Lunortiquetral Ligaments—E. Foss
  • MRI of Soft-Tissue Masses: An Approach to Analysis—M. Hochman

The American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education activities for physicians.

The ARRS designates this enduring material for a maximum of 30 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) and 30 American Board of Radiology, MOC Part II, Self-Assessment CME (SA-CME) credits. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.